The objective of this discussion is for students to apply critical thinking skills and research skills to analyze the book Confessions of an Economic Hit Man. In the process, students will learn about the US role in the World Trade Organization and the In

Module 4 Discussion
The objective of this discussion is for students to apply critical thinking skills and research skills to analyze the book Confessions of an Economic Hit Man. In the process, students will learn about the US role in the World Trade Organization and the International Monetary Fund, and the subjective nature of history.

Confessions of an Economic Hit Man is not a history book. It is a provocative account of one mans experience working as a chief economist for a company that provided data for international projects. This discussion centers around this book and includes two tasks.

Your first task is to discuss and evaluate the veracity of one event in this book. You cannot verify every scenario or event Perkins describes, so choose one broad scenario or event he describes (for example, the negotiations between the US State Department and Saudi Arabia about oil concessions, the involvement of the WTO in the development of electrical infrastructure in Indonesia, the role of oil companies in the Amazon, the relationship between the Summer Institute of Linguistics and the presence of oil companies in Ecuador, the US involvement in the 1953 coup in Iran, or the motives for the US invasion of Panama in 1989). Research this event as thoroughly as possible in order to assess how Perkins portrays it versus the real history, and offer an opinion about how accurately Perkins describes this event. Please cite all sources of information that you use.Please use the Davis Book chapter 10 and the Perkins book as two of your references: The United States in World History by Edward J. Davies II (NY: Taylor & Francis, 2006)Chapter 10
Bananas: How United Fruit Shaped the World by Peter Chapman (any edition)
Confessions of an Economic Hit Man by John Perkin (any edition)
All the Shah\’s Men by Stephen Kinzer