Write a 5-7-page (~1250-1750 words) detailed analysis of your specific building as outlined below.During the first lecture of this course we discussed some of the basic ways architecture can be analyzed. These include, as Vitruvius would say, \”firmness-commodity-delight,\” or in more laymen\’s terms: structure, function, and form. We can also talk about a building\’s cultural, physical, and historical contexts. (These are discussed in Handout 1 and should be familiar to you from the exam.) This section of your paper must include a discussion of all six categories mentioned above and structured to include an introduction, a conclusion, and subheadings for each of the six categories.

Part 1a: Write a 5-7-page (~1250-1750 words) detailed analysis of your specific building as outlined below.During the first lecture of this course we discussed some of the basic ways architecture can be analyzed. These include, as Vitruvius would say, \”firmness-commodity-delight,\” or in more laymen\’s terms: structure, function, and form. We can also talk about a building\’s cultural, physical, and historical contexts. (These are discussed in Handout 1 and should be familiar to you from the exam.) This section of your paper must include a discussion of all six categories mentioned above and structured to include an introduction, a conclusion, and subheadings for each of the six categories.Part 1b: Then add a 2-3-page (~500-750 words) discussion of your own views of the building and of its relevance today.This section consists of two sections with subheadings: 1) your own personal views of the building (i.e. how you feel about its aesthetic form, structural methods, and ability to meet its functional and cultural needs, and how it fit into its physical setting) and 2) lessons you learned about its design, construction process, and/or ability to meet the functional needs of the culture that built it that are relevant to architectural design today.**Note that this is a formal academic paper. You may only use academic sources to complete your paper, with most of your information deriving from books and articles from academic journals. Encyclopedias, including Wikipedia, personal travel blogs, and other non-vetted, non-academic website are not acceptable sources. Include in your paper at least one illustration of the building.Use the library resource World Cat (available via the “Library Resources” tab on the class D2L site) to identify potential books. If there are no monographs specifically on your building, look at more general books on the architecture of the culture that built it (i.e. “Greek Architecture,” “Hindu Architecture,” “Islamic Architecture”). If the books you are interested in using have been checked out, you can try to see if it is someone in the class who has them and if they would be willing to share them with you (please share) or do a recall on the book. If a book is not readily available from our library, you can request a copy through interlibrary loan (ILL) right online, but do leave yourself plenty of time as ILL can take several weeks to acquire materials.To locate journal articles on your building (which are often the best source of information), search both JSTOR and the Avery Index. There are links to these databases as well under the “Library Resources” tab on the class D2L site. If you are still having problems locating sources, ask a TA or reference librarian and/or see the tutorials on finding information in the “Library Resources” section of the class D2L site. Articles not available in the library’s catalog may be requested via ILL.**Your paper needs to be typed, double spaced, typo-proofed, and includes full, formal footnotes and a bibliography of the sources that you used following the Chicago Manual of Style (see class syllabus for basic examples of footnote and bibliography formats). You must footnote all quotes, major ideas, and details that you use from a source. This includes any material from the Web. Also, do not forget to provide a citation for your image(s).